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dc.contributor.authorBurg, Matthew Mark
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-14T19:16:51Z
dc.date.available2008-10-14T19:16:51Z
dc.date.issued1979-12
dc.identifier.other1979 .B91
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2092/802
dc.description30 leaves. Advisor: Mary Ann Powersen
dc.description.abstractThe Problem. While a variety of management techniques have been uti1ized to modify staff behavior, there remains to be found an effective cost and time efficient procedure to modify staff behavior on a long term basis. Procedures. A multiple baseline design in which self-recording was introduced across eight staff members was utilized to evaluate the effects of recording on the rate of staff-resident social interactions with mentally retarded institutionalized individuals. Observations were conducted as well on resident behavior, and resident and ward cleanliness. Findings. Interactions were found to increase from an average of 7% of all observations to an average of 54% of all observations made during the self-recording condition. Follow-up data provided similar results. Resident inappropriate behavior was found to decrease consistent with the intervention. Resident and ward cleanliness were found not to suffer. Conclusions. Self-recording was found to be an effective cost and time efficient procedure for modifying staff behavior. The effects of self-recording maintained during follow-up. Increasing social interactions has a beneficial effect on resident behavior. General work load on a ward can be increased without a decrease in ward cleanliness. Recommendations. Future research should examine the effects of social interactions contingent upon specific resident behaviors. The complex reciprocal interaction between staff and resident behavior should be investigated.en
dc.format.extent1660428 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherDrake Universityen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake University, School of Graduate Studies;1979
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectBehavior Modificationen
dc.titleThe Use of Self-Recording as a Staff Management Techniqueen
dc.typeThesisen


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