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dc.contributor.authorHarms, Dixie L.
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-13T20:28:02Z
dc.date.available2007-11-13T20:28:02Z
dc.date.issued1993-11
dc.identifier.other1993 .H228
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2092/683
dc.descriptionvi, 93 leaves. Advisor: Mary C. Hansenen
dc.description.abstractProblem: Nursing education administration in diploma schools of nursing must recognize that the organizational climate can affect the unity of the team as a whole. This team unity can affect nursing faculty's behavior, feelings, morale, well-being, job performance and satisfaction, and adaptation to srressors. These factors are instrumental in the achievement of organizational goals and must be considered by both nursing education administrators and faculty. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions regarding organizational climate of nursing faculty and administration in selected diploma schools of nursing. Using the results of this study, administration can identify areas needing intervention and implement and monitor changes in the work environment. If the climate of the organization and environment are understood, nursing education administration can create a structure and develop a climate that stimulates faculty achievement while maintaining satisfaction with the organization. Sample: Nursing faculty and nursing education administration from NLN-accredited diploma schools of nursing in the midwestern states of Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska and Wisconsin were invited to participate in this study. Work Environment Scale (WES) questionnaires and demographic tools were mailed to all nursing faculty members and nursing education administrators identified through an initial contact letter sent to nursing administrators in twenty-one schools of nursing. Sixty-seven percent of invited diploma schools of nursing agreed to participate in the study. There was greater than 92% response rate from nursing education administrators and a greater than 62% response rate from nursing faculty members. Findings: 70% of the WES subscales yielded above average scores for perceptions of the work environment. Nursing education administrators' scores were generally higher than nursing faculty members with the exception of the subscale Work Pressure. A t-test of the means of the subscale scores yielded three areas of significance in perceptions of the work environment between nursing faculty members and nursing education administrators: supervisor support, clarity and innovation. Conclusions: Differences in perceptions of organizational climate between nursing education administrators and nursing faculty members were identified. These areas provide useful information to improve the working environment in diploma schools of nursing.en
dc.format.extent4582547 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherDrake Universityen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake University Theses, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences;1993
dc.subjectNursing--Faculty--Attitudesen
dc.subjectNurse administrators--Attitudesen
dc.subjectCorporate culture--Nursing--Evaluationen
dc.subjectNursing--Job satisfaction--Evaluationen
dc.titleThe Perceptions of Organizational Climate of Nursing Faculty Members and Nursing Education Administrators in Selected Diploma Schools of Nursingen
dc.typeThesisen


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