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dc.contributor.authorLouie, Therese A.
dc.contributor.authorNishijima, Marissa Y.H.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-23T18:49:25Z
dc.date.available2021-11-23T18:49:25Z
dc.date.issued2021-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://escholarshare.drake.edu/handle/2092/2241
dc.descriptionPeer-Reviewed Journal Article. 17 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractIn terms of the expense, spending $50 a week on both commuting and on a recreational happy hour should be perceived equally. Yet, it is proposed that consumers tend to overestimate their level of spending on necessities, and underestimate their extent of nonessential expenses. In two studies, participants predicted their level of spending in essential and nonessential purchase categories, and then recorded their actual spending across multiple weeks. Results show support for each hypothesis in some categories, and propose factors that produce accurate estimates for other purchase types. Consequences of spending misperceptions are discussed, as well as suggestions to reduce them.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDrake Management Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake Management Review;Volume 11, Issue 1-2, October 2021
dc.subjectMarketingen_US
dc.titleMore Bills than Thrills? Comparing Predicted and Actual Levels of Essential and Nonessential Spendingen_US
dc.typeAnimationen_US


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