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dc.contributor.authorHwang, Michael T. C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T17:50:07Z
dc.date.available2021-02-18T17:50:07Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.other1988 ,H92
dc.identifier.urihttps://escholarshare.drake.edu/handle/2092/2229
dc.description102 leavesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe problem. The objective of this research was to examine the attitudes toward death and dying of Chinese college students in Mainland China, PRC, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan, ROC and to compare their attitudes with those of their American counterparts. Four major questions were addressed in the research. With respect to attitudes toward one's death and dying, toward death and dying of a loved one, and toward hospice care, are there significant differences between colleges students from: (1) Mainland China, PRC, Hong Kong, Singapore, as well as Taiwan, ROC and the United States? (2) Mainland China, PRC and the United States? (3) Taiwan, ROC and the United States? and (4) Mainland China, PRC, and Taiwan, ROC? Procedure. This study used a survey research design, involving a non­ random purposive sample of college students drawn from Mainland China, PRC, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan, ROC. Four hundred and eighty Chinese and 311 Americans responded to the mailed questionnaire. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Test were used to test the twelve research hypotheses. Findings. The null hypothesis was rejected in ten of the twelve cases. The results indicated that (1) with respect to attitudes toward one's death and dying, there were significant differences in all the four comparisons; (2) regarding attitudes toward the death and dying of a loved one among Chinese and American students differences were found; and (3) concerning attitudes toward hospice care differences were identified among Taiwan, ROC Chinese students and American students. Conclusions. American college students were less fearful of their own death and dying as well as the death and dying of their loved one as compared to their Chinese counterparts, but Chinese college students as a group and particularly those from Taiwan, ROC were more receptive to hospice care in comparison with American students. It was concluded that there were significant cultural differences concerning attitudes toward death and dying. With the exception of attitudes toward death and dying of a loved one, college students from Taiwan, ROC were significantly less fearful of one's death and dying and more receptive to hospice care in comparison with those from Mainland China, PRC. It was recommended that death education be introduced in Chinese society so as to dispel the public's fear about death and dying and that hospice care be established so as to help terminal patients and their families face this final stage in life.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDrake Universityen_US
dc.subjectAttitude to deathen_US
dc.subjectCollege studentsen_US
dc.titleA Cross-Cultural Study of Attitudes Toward Death and Dying Between Chinese and American College Studentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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