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dc.contributor.authorLuthy, Michael R.
dc.contributor.authorPadgett, Barry L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-20T19:42:07Z
dc.date.available2020-11-20T19:42:07Z
dc.date.issued2020-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://escholarshare.drake.edu/handle/2092/2219
dc.descriptionPeer-Reviewed Journal Article. 22 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractA seemingly endless series of high-profile incidents involving the actions of some prominent United States and European corporate and government individuals have occurred in recent years, weakening faith in leaders, intuitions and the marketplace. This has fueled discussions concerning ethical behavior in business by those in leadership positions. These events have brought more attention to post-secondary schools of business that seek to prepare future business professionals for situations and circumstances they may face. Yet, students do not come to post-secondary intuitions as blank slates. With regard to ethics and other aspects of their moral foundation much has already been shaped and determined. The current study explores a specific cohort of these students, namely women of Generation Z who will soon begin their careers in industry and government. A good number of these women will eventually rise to significant leadership positions in their chosen fields. Results from over 250 Generation Z women participating in a Research Lab housed at a medium sized university in the southern part of the United States are presented and discussed. Specifically, the study reports on: (1) research from a number of fields addressing ethical development and systems, (2) the ethical influences on these individuals, (3) self-reported knowledge of various moral perspectives and ethical issues, and (4) their evaluations on the severity of a number of behaviors. Results are discussed in the context of how Generation Z women may manage differently than those currently holding positions of power and authority in our society.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDrake Management Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake Management Review;Volume 10, Issue 1, October 2020
dc.subjectBusiness and Societyen_US
dc.subjectHuman Resource Managementen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational Behavioren_US
dc.titleThe Coming Managerial Class: Generation Z Women and Their Ethicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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