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dc.contributor.authorHarrell, Alyssa
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-08T20:53:15Z
dc.date.available2019-08-08T20:53:15Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://escholarshare.drake.edu/handle/2092/2169
dc.description193 leavesen_US
dc.description.abstractDespite the growing recognition on the importance of mental health and wellbeing, college students’ mental health and wellbeing continue to decline. Given this information, research is needed to explore potential predictors of college student stress. Utilizing a theoretical model of Self-Actualization Wellness and the Person-Environment Fit Theory, the purpose of this study was to explore potential predictors that may impact college students’ wellness. More specifically, the extent to which a higher level of development in each of the seven dimensions of the theoretical model of Self-Actualization Wellness reduces the impact of college student stressors and areas of concern. Identified areas of college student stress or concern are a) person variables and b) environment variables. A quantitative approach and survey methodology were utilized in this study. Moreover, participants included 199 college-aged students, mostly undergrads, from universities in the central United States. Independent samples t-test revealed males had a higher mean self-sufficiency, self-care, self-assess, self-advocate, and self-advocate score than females. Furthermore, hierarchical regression analyses suggested that gender, ethnicity, age, intelligence beliefs of a growth mindset, level of extroversion, and six of the seven dimensions of Self Actualization Wellness (self-sufficiency, self-care, self-social understanding, self-assess, self advocate, and self-compassion) statistically significantly predicted person variables and environment variables. Recommendations for college students, postsecondary institutions, and policy makers and discussed, along with recommendations for future research.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDrake Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake University, School of Education;2018
dc.titleSelf-Actualization Wellness: A Developmental Approach to Predicting and Reducing College Student Stress Related to Person and Environment Variablesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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