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dc.contributor.authorBauer, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-07T16:48:21Z
dc.date.available2015-05-07T16:48:21Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2092/2097
dc.description130 pagesen_US
dc.description.abstractOf all the students entering a four-year institution of higher education, only 52.8% graduate within five years (Noble & Sawyer, 2013). Over the years, American higher education has made little progress toward improving the graduation rate and ensuring students entering college will be successful. University leaders and policymakers have increased their academic success efforts to improve retention and graduation rates (Bettinger & Baker, 2014). Using the theory of social connectedness, the purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the extent to which quality relationships with peers, faculty, and staff predict student retention and graduation at a small, private institution located in the central United States. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated financial debt as a statistically significant predictor of student retention. In regards to graduation, no variables were found to be statistically significant. Seniors were significantly more likely than freshmen to have quality relationships with peers. Females were significantly more likely than males to develop quality relationships with staff. In this study, with financial debt being the greatest predictor of retention, institutions could provide debt counselors to help students navigate through any financial challenges they may encounter. Another option would be to charge tuition as a complete package rather than paying per semester. Paying upfront could increase the commitment level on behalf of the student and allow institutions to capture money that is normally lost when a student leaves, allowing institutions to lower overall tuition. Further details and additional recommendations for policy and practice are provided for students and institutions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherDrake Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake University, School of Education;2015
dc.subjectCollege graduates--Finance, Personalen_US
dc.subjectStudent retention--Education, Higheren_US
dc.subjectSocial connectedness--Students--Education, Higheren_US
dc.titleSocial Connectedness and Student Debt: Predicting College Retention at a Four-Year Private Liberal Arts Institutionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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