James Joyce and His Influence : William Faulkner and Anthony Burgess

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dc.contributor.author Burke, Maxine
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-17T21:49:06Z
dc.date.available 2009-11-17T21:49:06Z
dc.date.issued 1981-07
dc.identifier.other 1981 .B917
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2092/986
dc.description.abstract The problem. James Joyce's Ulysses provides a basis for examining and analyzing the influence of Joyce on selected works of William Faulkner and Anthony Burgess especially in regard to the major ideas and style, and pattern and motif. The works to be used, in addition to Ulysses, include Faulkner's "The Bear" in Go Down, Moses and Mosquitoes and Burgess' Nothing Like the Sun. For the purpose, then, of determining to what degree Joyce has influenced other writers, the ideas and techniques that explain his influence such as his linguistic innovations, his use of mythology, and his stream-of-consciousness technique are discussed. Procedure. Research includes a careful study of each of the works to be used and an examination of various critics and their works for contributions to this influence study. The plan of analysis and presentation includes, then, a prefatory section of the dissertation which provides a general statement stating the thesis of this dissertation, some background material on Joyce and his Ulysses, and a summary of the material discussed in each chapter. Next are three chapters which explain Joyce's influence: an introduction to Joyce and Ulysses; Joyce and Faulkner; and Joyce and Burgess. Thus Chapter One, for the purpose of showing how Joyce influences other writers, discusses the ideas and techniques that explain his influences--such things as his linguistic innovations, his use of mythology, and his stream-of-consciousness method. Chapter Two traces the pattern of Joyce's influence on William Faulkner in Faulkner's "The Bear" and in his Mosquitoes. Among the techniques discussed for comparisons and parallels between the two authors are language, time and timelessness, the journey motif, and the stream-of-consciousness technique. Chapter Three examines the influence of Joyce on Anthony Burgess in Burgess' Nothing Like the Sun. The similarities between the library scene of Joyce's Ulysses, in which Stephen Dedalus proposes a theory about the life and works of Shakespeare, and Burgess' novel (how closely Burgess follows Stephen's discussion of Shakespeare) are traced through biography, sexuality and women, and religion. And finally, a conclusion is included in the dissertation which summarizes the ways by which Joyce influences other writers, especially in regard to Burgess and Faulkner. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Drake University en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Drake University, School of Graduate Studies;1981
dc.subject Joyce, James, 1882-1942--Influence en_US
dc.subject Joyce, James,1882-1941--Ulysses en_US
dc.subject Faulkner, William, 1897-1962--Criticism and interpretation en_US
dc.subject Burgess, Anthony, 1917- --Criticism and Interpretation en_US
dc.title James Joyce and His Influence : William Faulkner and Anthony Burgess en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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