The Purified Vision: The Fiction of Wallace Spegner

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dc.contributor.author Otis, John Whitacre
dc.date.accessioned 2009-02-17T16:08:18Z
dc.date.available 2009-02-17T16:08:18Z
dc.date.issued 1977-07
dc.identifier.other 1977 .Ot4
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2092/872
dc.description 124 leaves. Advisor: Stuart Burns en
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examines the most prominent characteristics of Wallace Stegner's fiction. The controlling theme is the "purified vision" or Stegner's dedication to the principle of clarity in art. This principle serves as unifying metaphor and loose framework for a three part study of method, theme, and poetic effect. Part I is an analysis of Stegner's first person narrators and his use of the bird motif. The discussion is concerned primarily with the first person narrators, Joe Allston and Lyman Ward, who appear in Stegner's recent fiction. They are assessed as both characters and devices in reference to Wayne Booth's classification of fictional narrators. The focus here is on point of view, the consequences and appropriateness of the first person narrator for fiction. Part II examines a major element in Stegner's fiction, the protagonist's search for himself which usually involves him with some kind of father/authority figure on the filial, political, or spiritual levels. The broad theme of paternalism is expressed in a variety of patterns but the father and son relationships of The Big Rock Candy Mountain and the Joe Allston novels are the most significant. It is this theme of paternalism that produces the warm humanity and passionate parenthood of Stegner's fiction. Part III marks a culmination with the discussion of the spiritual/poetic dimensions of Stegner's works. It suggests that Stegner is most evocative and poetic when working with time and his "ghosts of memory" or his "ghosts of meaning"--and that though he is " no mystic of any stripe," he nevertheless succeeds in being most mystical with non-mystical/non-spectacular means--the purified vision which in this case serves spiritual truth. The conclusion evaluates Stegner's critics to date plus asserting the importance of this supremely versatile artist. en
dc.format.extent 7123402 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Drake University en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Drake University, School of Graduate Studies;1977
dc.subject Western stories--History and criticism en
dc.subject Short stories en
dc.subject West (U.S.)--In literature en
dc.subject Stegner, Wallace Earle, 1909-1993--Short Stories--Criticism and interpretation en
dc.title The Purified Vision: The Fiction of Wallace Spegner en
dc.type Thesis en


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