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dc.contributor.authorDruart, Carol Fox
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-07T18:33:06Z
dc.date.available2008-07-07T18:33:06Z
dc.date.issued1983-09
dc.identifier.other1983 .D84
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2092/756
dc.descriptionvii, 119 leaves. Advisor: Dr. Raymond Hock.en
dc.description.abstractThe problem. Questions to be Answered. (l) Is there a relationship between self-concept and curricular involvement in the arts? If so what is the direction of that relationship? (2) Is there a relationship between cerebral dominance and curricular involvement in the arts? If so what is the direction of that relationship? (3) Is there a relationship between cerebral dominance and self-concept? If so what is the direction of that relationship? Procedures. Subjects were sixty volunteers from specially chosen curricular areas of students at several midwestern colleges. The students' curricular areas represent what is assumed to be those requiring linear (left cerebral) and creative (right cerebral) functioning by their nature. These choices were made in an effort to provide more lateralized subjects, for more concise data. Participants were given a battery of tests suggested to determine self-concept and cerebral dominance. Findings. This research did not find a significant difference between the self-concept of students involved in an arts curriculum and those involved in a fact oriented curriculum. This research did not find significant difference between the self-concept of students and their right or left cerebral dominance or orientation. This research did, however, find significant difference between the right/left cerebral dominance of students who were involved in arts vs. fact curriculum. The arts students excelled at right cerebral activities and the fact oriented students excelled in left cerebral activities. Conclusion. This research supports past research which shows a relationship between student curricular involvement and cerebral lateralization. Recommendations. It is recommended that instruments be developed to better measure cerebral lateralization of activity as well as balanced activity. It is further recommended that future research in this area include a sample which is balanced in the several areas of the arts and in male/female members.en
dc.format.extent4061365 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherDrake Universityen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDrake University, School of Graduate Studies;1983
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectArt--Study and teachingen
dc.subjectMusic--Instruction and studyen
dc.subjectCerebral dominanceen
dc.titleThe Arts in Education: A Possible Key to Whole Brain Utilization and Positive Self-Concepten
dc.typeThesisen


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