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dc.contributor.authorVanLandegen, Sarah K.
dc.contributor.authorAndresen, Jan-Michael
dc.contributor.authorMcVey, Quinn A.
dc.contributor.authorGoranson, Kari E.
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-10T15:11:16Z
dc.date.available2010-05-10T15:11:16Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-10T15:11:16Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2092/1369
dc.descriptionAdvisor: Davis S. Senchinaen_US
dc.description.abstractThe evolution of video games seems to have revolutionized the way many pursue entertainment, activities, and now, even fitness. With physically interactive games systems such as the Wii being taken by a storm it may lead one to question where the virtual aspect ends and actual physical skill begins. What role, if any, does skill in the suggested physical subject have on the virtual world and visa versa? The purpose of this experiment was to explore this matter. This research was conducted collecting data from 15 subjects. We examined both field soccer tests (shooting, slalom completion, and sprint with dribble) and Wii FIFA performance as our model for comparison. Our research project was hypothesis-driven and we predicted to uncover a positive correlation between field soccer skills and Wii soccer skills because theoretically skill in one area should enhance performance in the other. First, we found no difference in Wii soccer video game performance when subjects were playing another human versus playing the Wii computer itself. We then focused on just the subject vs. Wii data set. Statistical analysis of 3 separate comparisons between Wii performance and field skill performance uncovered no significant correlations. Further research can and should be explored to consider alternative variables that may yield different results.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDrake University, International Relations Program, Biochemistry, Cell, and Molecular Biology Program, Department of Biologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDUCURS 2010;11
dc.subjectSoccer--Ability testingen_US
dc.subjectNintendo Wii video games--Performanceen_US
dc.titleRelationship Between Field Soccer Skills and Computer-Simulated Soccer Skillsen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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  • DUCURS [196]
    Poster sessions and presentation from the Drake University Conference on Undergraduate Research in the Sciences held each April at Olmsted Center on the Drake campus.

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